California leads the USA in innovation, or does it?

Remember? We already told you about Utility patents. They are the most common patent type and a primary means of protecting intellectual property and technological innovation. IFI CLAIMS®Patent Services recently announced its top-50 ranking of global companies awarded the most U.S. utility patents in 2011. IBM remains in the first position, as it has for 19 years in a row, with a record of 6180 utility patents. Samsung trails second with 4894 and Canon replaces Microsoft in the third slot with 2821.

According to IFI, the USPTO issued 224.505 utility patents in 2011, an increase of two percent over 2010’s record breaking total. While preparing the 2011 Patent Intelligence and Technology Report, IFI analysts took a closer look at the 2011 US patent grants and in particular the location of the inventors named on these documents. Despite the obvious surge of Japanese, Korean, and Chinese companies in the Top 50 assignees, 50% of US patents in 2011 named US inventors.

Diving deeper into the US inventor information the IFI analysts could rank the States based on inventor data. In this case a patent is credited to a state if at least one of the patent’s inventors resides in the state. The top 10 states are shown below:

State
2011 US Utility Patent Grants
California 32,715
Texas 9,407
New York 9,263
Massachusetts 7,106
Washington 5,737
New Jersey 5,583
Illinois 4,933
Pennsylvania 4,746
Michigan 4,644
Minnesota 4,609



As you see California is the clear leader with respect to the overall volume of patents accounting for 15% of the total number of US utility patents granted in 2011. However when you factor in population, IFI analysts find Vermont at the top of list along with Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The figure below shows a graph of the top 10 states by number of utility patents granted, and the number of patents granted per 100.000 residents.


So what exactly is going on in Vermont that accounts for its performance? The IFI analysts looked at the assignees and found IBM accounting for most of the patent activity. How come? IBM has a large facility in Burlington that designs and produces semiconductors.

Did you know the connection?

Maple syrup, lacrosse and kayaks have one thing in common. Guess what? No idea? Well, they are all inventions of Native Americans. Yesterday we told you about some important inventions by African-Americans, today let´s have a closer look at things Native Americans came up with.

Maple syrup, for instance. Aboriginal peoples living in the northeastern part of North America were the first groups known to have produced maple syrup and maple sugar. They let the sap of the maple tree drip into pails and boiled it until it turned into syrup.




The game of lacrosse was invented by the American tribes living around the St. Lawrence River in New York and Ontario, and was spread by the Huron and the Iroquois.

Traditional lacrosse games were sometimes major events that could last serveral days. As many as 100 to 1000 men from opposite villages or tribes would participate. The Cherokees called the sport „the little brother of war“ because it was considered excellent military training.

The kayak on the other hand was invented by the Inuit Peoples. The skin-covered kayaks of the Arctic people are excellent examples of a technology developed over centuries of experimental refinement and everyday use.

Important African-American inventions

Do you know that some of the world´s most popular inventions were created by African-Americans? In honor of Black History Month Inventors Digest is currently celebrating the valuable contributions of famous black inventors.

As an example the magazine names Lewis Howard Latimer. In 1874, he copatented (with Charles W. Brown) an improved toilet system for railroad cars. In 1881 Latimer received another patent for the „Process of Manufacturing Carbons“, an improved method for the production of carbon filaments used in lightbulbs.

We want to introduce you another important African-American inventor – Garrett Morgan.

He created a Safety Hood and 1914 patented it as a Breathing Device, which later came to be known as the Gas Mask. Morgan’s Gas Mask consisted of a hood with two long tubes, one allowing in clean air and the other allowing the user to exhale air out of the hood.

After witnessing a collision between an automobile and a horse-drawn carriage, Morgan also took his turn at inventing a traffic signal. As you can read on about.com the Morgan traffic signal was a T-shaped pole unit that featured three positions: Stop, Go and an all-directional stop position. This „third position“ halted traffic in all directions to allow pedestrians to cross streets more safely.

Do you want to know who invented the elevator, the lawn mower or the refrigerator.

Here you find a list of other important African-American inventors. Check it out!

The Female Edison

Have you ever heard somebody using this expression? It is not a way to refer Mrs Edison, no, it actually describes women that were able to receive patents for various products and ideas. One of them is Margaret Knight, the first women who received a U.S. Patent and who was also known as the Queen of Paper Bags.

Margaret was born in York, Maine, but spent her childhood in Manchester, New Hampshire. She had little bothers and made kites and sleds for them, which where the envy of the neighborhood. Although she only received her first patent at the age of 30, these kites can be considered her first inventions. As an adult, Margaret Knight moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where she worked in a manufacturing company for paper bags.

While working there, she invented machinery that would automatically fold and glue the bottom of the bag to create a bottom square. But since the reaction to this improvement was not positive, Margaret moved on and founded the Eastern Paper Bag Company in 1870.

Every paper grocery bag that we can find in stores today, goes back to her inventions. She also invented a number of domestic gadget in her life like a numbering machine and a window frame and sash, patented in 1894. However, her creativity never gave her much profit. She died of pneumonia in 1914 leaving an estate valued at less than $300.

Do You Know … Dr. Robert Cade?

First, he invented a drink and now there will be a museum named after him, the Cade Museum for Invention and Innovation. But let’s start from the beginning.

Robert Cade was born in September 1927, in San Antonio, Texas, and worked most of his life at the medical school at the University of Florida. During his career at the University he was the lead inventor of Gatorade, which is now a well known product of PepsiCo and distributed into 80 countries.

Like many inventors, his main aim was to find a solution to a common everyday challenge: How can sports men quickly replenish the liquid they lose in sweat during a tournament? They need more than just water, they also need carbohydrates and electrolytes. He developed a drink for the athletic team of the University called „the Gators“, where the name Gatorade derives from.

Although Gatorade is his best know invention, Dr Cade was interested in many other fields. Among others, his numerous inventions also include the first shock dissipating football helmet and he was also a musician and collected Violins.

In 2008, the Cade Museum Foundation had announced that the Depot Park in Gainsville, Florida, had been selected as location. The museum will be built in 3 phases and will inspire future entrepreneurs and inventors through exhibitions, creativity programs and many other events.

The Foundation has been supporting Florida inventors for many years and just recently announced the 2012 Cade Museum Prize, giving away $50,000 in prize money for the successful candidate. This prize should encourage and inspire the work of all Florida inventors and early-stage entrepreneurs, says Phoebe Miles Cade, President of the Cade Museum Foundation.

Another Year is Coming to an End

… and we should take the time to sit back and reflect on all the important events of 2011.

Among the people that sadly passed away in 2011, the world lost one of its best known inventors and entrepreneurs. Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple, died on October 5, 2011, after fighting pancreatic cancer for many years. He lost the battle, aged only 56.

He was a great inventor and business man and co-founder of Apple, Inc. He overlooked the creation of the iMac, iTunes, iPod, iPhone and iPad. The impact of his influence reaches far into our personal lives. Most of us find it practically impossible to imagine a life without our smart phone. In order to commemorate his achievements, the United States Patent and Trademark Officeshows an exhibition in the Inventors Hall of Fame at their head office in Alexandria, Virginia. It is open to the public and the admission is free until January 15, 2012 where more than 300 patents, which bear the name of Steve Jobs along with many trademarks that have given Apple its recognizable identity around the world, can be seen.

This exhibition was created by Invent Now, Inc., which is a non-profit organization dedicated to show and preserve the inventions created in America and around the world.

Hello and Welcome to Inpama.com…

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